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Iraki military lack firepower to decisively recapture ISIL-controlled areas in Anbar province.

Risk of wider Sunni anti-Government insurgency will continue to deter Baghdad from launching full assault against militants in Anbar – See more at: http://worldreports.csarn.org/2014/02/iraq-risk-of-wider-sunni-anti-government-insurgency-will-continue-to-deter-baghdad-from-launching-fu.html#sthash.ZBS9MgUB.dpuf

Security forces and local Sunni tribes killed 57 Sunni militants in Ramadi on 3 February as part of a gathering offensive against insurgents in Anbar. The assault came after the end of a deadline issued by the Anbar Provincial Council demanding the surrender of all anti-Government forces in Ramadi and Fallujah by 2 February. However, jihadists and allied local Sunnis have defied the ultimatum and continue to hold large sections of the cities.

The fighting comes as a statement from al-Qaeda’s General Command (its central military leadership) was published on 3 February effectively expelling al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI) from the wider movement. This split is the result of AQI’s defiance of orders not to operate in Syria, where it has been fighting under the name of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The fracturing of al-Qaeda will have significant consequences for both the central leadership and ISIL – something we will be commenting on in more depth soon – though ISIL’s immediate position in Anbar is unlikely to be

– See more at: http://worldreports.csarn.org/2014/02/iraq-risk-of-wider-sunni-anti-government-insurgency-will-continue-to-deter-baghdad-from-launching-fu.html#sthash.ZBS9MgUB.dpuf

Security forces and local Sunni tribes killed 57 Sunni militants in Ramadi on 3 February as part of a gathering offensive against insurgents in Anbar. The assault came after the end of a deadline issued by the Anbar Provincial Council demanding the surrender of all anti-Government forces in Ramadi and Fallujah by 2 February. However, jihadists and allied local Sunnis have defied the ultimatum and continue to hold large sections of the cities.

The fighting comes as a statement from al-Qaeda’s General Command (its central military leadership) was published on 3 February effectively expelling al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI) from the wider movement. This split is the result of AQI’s defiance of orders not to operate in Syria, where it has been fighting under the name of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The fracturing of al-Qaeda will have significant consequences for both the central leadership and ISIL – something we will be commenting on in more depth soon – though ISIL’s immediate position in Anbar is unlikely to be

threatened as a result.ISIL has a different, less pragmatic approach to that of al-Qaeda central

– See more at: http://worldreports.csarn.org/2014/02/iraq-risk-of-wider-sunni-anti-government-insurgency-will-continue-to-deter-baghdad-from-launching-fu.html#sthash.ZBS9MgUB.dpuf

Security forces and local Sunni tribes killed 57 Sunni militants in Ramadi on 3 February as part of a gathering offensive against insurgents in Anbar. The assault came after the end of a deadline issued by the Anbar Provincial Council demanding the surrender of all anti-Government forces in Ramadi and Fallujah by 2 February. However, jihadists and allied local Sunnis have defied the ultimatum and continue to hold large sections of the cities.

The fighting comes as a statement from al-Qaeda’s General Command (its central military leadership) was published on 3 February effectively expelling al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI) from the wider movement. This split is the result of AQI’s defiance of orders not to operate in Syria, where it has been fighting under the name of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The fracturing of al-Qaeda will have significant consequences for both the central leadership and ISIL – something we will be commenting on in more depth soon – though ISIL’s immediate position in Anbar is unlikely to be

threatened as a result.ISIL has a different, less pragmatic approach to that of al-Qaeda central

– See more at: http://worldreports.csarn.org/2014/02/iraq-risk-of-wider-sunni-anti-government-insurgency-will-continue-to-deter-baghdad-from-launching-fu.html#sthash.ZBS9MgUB.dpuf

 

 

Middle East Security News.-Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki surrounded by his bodyguards.

Middle East Security News.-Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki surrounded by his bodyguards.

Risk of wider Sunni anti-Government insurgency will continue to deter Baghdad from launching full assault against militants in Anbar. GO TO SOURCE

Security forces and local Sunni tribes killed 57 Sunni militants in Ramadi on 3 February as part of a gathering offensive against insurgents in Anbar. The assault came after the end of a deadline issued by the Anbar Provincial Council demanding the surrender of all anti-Government forces in Ramadi and Fallujah by 2 February. However, jihadists and allied local Sunnis have defied the ultimatum and continue to hold large sections of the cities.

The fighting comes as a statement from al-Qaeda’s General Command (its central military leadership) was published on 3 February effectively expelling al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI) from the wider movement. This split is the result of AQI’s defiance of orders not to operate in Syria, where it has been fighting under the name of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The fracturing of al-Qaeda will have significant consequences for both the central leadership and ISIL – something we will be commenting on in more depth soon – though ISIL’s immediate position in Anbar is unlikely to be

– See more at: http://worldreports.csarn.org/2014/02/iraq-risk-of-wider-sunni-anti-government-insurgency-will-continue-to-deter-baghdad-from-launching-fu.html#sthash.ZBS9MgUB.dpuf

Security forces and local Sunni tribes killed 57 Sunni militants in Ramadi on 3 February as part of a gathering offensive against insurgents in Anbar. The assault came after the end of a deadline issued by the Anbar Provincial Council demanding the surrender of all anti-Government forces in Ramadi and Fallujah by 2 February. However, jihadists and allied local Sunnis have defied the ultimatum and continue to hold large sections of the cities. – See more at: http://worldreports.csarn.org/2014/02/iraq-risk-of-wider-sunni-anti-government-insurgency-will-continue-to-deter-baghdad-from-launching-fu.html#sthash.ZBS9MgUB.dpuf

 

Security forces and local Sunni tribes killed 57 Sunni militants in Ramadi on 3 February as part of a gathering offensive against insurgents in Anbar. The assault came after the end of a deadline issued by the Anbar Provincial Council demanding the surrender of all anti-Government forces in Ramadi and Fallujah by 2 February. However, jihadists and allied local Sunnis have defied the ultimatum and continue to hold large sections of the cities.

The fighting comes as a statement from al-Qaeda’s General Command (its central military leadership) was published on 3 February effectively expelling al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI) from the wider movement. This split is the result of AQI’s defiance of orders not to operate in Syria, where it has been fighting under the name of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The fracturing of al-Qaeda will have significant consequences for both the central leadership and ISIL – something we will be commenting on in more depth soon – though ISIL’s immediate position in Anbar is unlikely to be

threatened as a result.ISIL has a different, less pragmatic approach to that of al-Qaeda central

– See more at: http://worldreports.csarn.org/2014/02/iraq-risk-of-wider-sunni-anti-government-insurgency-will-continue-to-deter-baghdad-from-launching-fu.html#sthash.ZBS9MgUB.dpuf