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Isolation of military regime in Egypt could change geopolitics in the Middle East.

The political isolation of egyptian strong man General Abdulfattah al Sisi has increased and could oblige him to make new moves and alliances or withdraw support to President Manzour. . Photo Credit  AFP Getty Images

The political isolation of egyptian strong man General Abdulfattah al Sisi has increased and could oblige him to make new moves and alliances or withdraw support to President Manzour. . Photo Credit AFP Getty Images

Egyptian security officers killed at least 500 hundred muslim supporters of the ousted president, Mohamed Morsi, on Wednesday.

The killings showed the determination of the military to crush the Islamists who dominated two years of free elections.It also showed their inability to manage power in a civilized way, and by doing so the isolation and overthrow of the military regime is a  matter of time.  Unless -after burning all bridges-  the new regime prefer the “syrian way” and start exploring new allies by flirting with Russia, China and Iran (?). Recently, Gen Abdulfattah al-Sisi, the Egyptian general who deposed Mohammed Morsi, the country’s democratically-elected president,  has accused the US of “turning your backs” on Egypt.

This is the third mass killing of Islamist demonstrators since the egyptian military ousted former President Morsi six weeks ago. The difference here is that this attack showed increasing ferocity and lasted more than 12 hours, with  bulldozers, real ammunition, armored vehicles, tear gas and snipers.

One of the killed was the 17-year-old daughter of a prominent Islamist leader, Mohamed el-Beltagy.

The figurehead in charge of the Presidency of Egypt, Mr. Adli Mansour  declared a state of emergency and imposed a 7 p.m. curfew in most of the country, closed the banks and shut down all north-south train service.

Mansour has the support of  Gen. Abdul-Fattah el-Sisi.

The Muslim Brotherhood, the main Islamist group behind Mr. Morsi, will try to step up the protests, until now using rocks and molotovs. Clashes and gunfire broke out in many places in the capital and angry Islamists attacked at least a dozen police stations around the country, killing more than 40 police officers.

They also attacked and/or burned seven christian churches, according to the interior minister. Coptic Christian and human rights groups said the number was far higher.

The Western diplomats are failing in their attempt to broker a political resolution where Islamists concede and “rejoin a renewed democratic process”.

The assault prompted the resignation of the interim vice president, Mohamed ElBaradei, a prowestern politician , a Nobel Prize-winning and former diplomat who tried to legitimize the democratic goals of the military takeover.

“We have reached a state of harder polarization and more dangerous division, with the social fabric in danger of tearing, because violence only begets violence,” Mr. ElBaradei wrote in a public letter to the president. “The beneficiaries of what happened today are the preachers of violence and terrorism, the most extremist groups,” he said, “and you will remember what I am telling you.”